Le Week-end’s Soundtrack

le_week-end_2698189bLe Week-end (2013) follows a married couple’s holiday in Paris as they try to reinvigorate their love and marriage. A quaint and quite likeable film, it is a pleasurable watch. What really stood out for me was the soundtrack composed by Jeremy Sams. I am a sucker for jazz.

The soundtrack is filled with jazz pieces and we get a lot of rich sounds which does wonders for the Parisian backdrop. One of my personal favourites is the muted trumpet. It’s a sound that I love to hear in any song. It’s found throughout the soundtrack in particular “Train Music,” “Bank Girl” & “Doing A Runner.” It’s a quite solitary sound is it works well on its own. It conjures up this idea of solitude. But obviously because of the film the music isn’t bleak and the trumpet becomes a sort of comfort and warmth. In “Doing A Runner” the trumpet is accompanied by a double bass, drums and saxophone. It’s much more up tempo than the other tracks and consequently has an uplifting feel to it.

The piano plays an important role throughout the soundtrack. It’s used greatly in the contrast with silence. The notes are short and hang in the air like in “Nick In Corridor.” It’s quite minimalist and intermittent. We get this kind of gliding feeling when the piano is accompanied by the double bass like in “Train Music.”

In “Restaurant Wander” we get this smooth jazz vibe. The electric guitar (I think) is used to great avail here in creating this relaxing feeling. We also get the accordion which is an essential instrument in creating the Parisian sound-scape. It’s used prominently in “Hotel Escape.”

One of the more memorable tracks, “Madison,” is used during the dance scene. It’s an up tempo piece and in many ways the most fun. It works in contrast with all of the other tracks as it feels as though each instrument comes into its own in this piece. They really let go in this song and it’s almost like a catharsis. The trumpet is playful and unrestrained along with the saxophone, piano and drums. A great piece to end the movie on with a classic finish.

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